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Richard Bennett 3/13/2016
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Private. Collaborators only.
Selection made on Version 8
There is a perennial call to “make the network smart.” Someone always wants to optimize it, establish “quality of service” mechanisms – for example, to make voice calls more reliable. But whenever you optimize the network for one thing, you risk de-optimizing it for another. It turns out that just adding more bandwidth has been cheaper than making the network “smarter” (This argument - that you fix networks by making them faster, not smarter - is key to understanding net neutrality).
It turns out that just adding more bandwidth has been cheaper than making the network “smarter” (This argument - that you fix networks by making them faster, not smarter - is key to understanding net neutrality).
The claim that adding bandwidth cures all ills in “the network” is an anachronism left over from the time when “the network” consisted solely of wired data links that could be arbitrarily upgraded with little cost. While it has never been the correct solution to all forms of short-term congestion, it’s laughable out of touch with the reality of the wireless edge that currently dominates the Internet.