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Patrick Collins 3/13/2016
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Private. Collaborators only.
Selection made on Version 8
There is a perennial call to “make the network smart.” Someone always wants to optimize it, establish “quality of service” mechanisms – for example, to make voice calls more reliable. But whenever you optimize the network for one thing, you risk de-optimizing it for another. It turns out that just adding more bandwidth has been cheaper than making the network “smarter” (This argument - that you fix networks by making them faster, not smarter - is key to understanding net neutrality).
But whenever you optimize the network for one thing, you risk de-optimizing it for another.
I don’t think this is really the issue at hand with net neutrality/QoS/etc. There are no technical hurdles to a good QoS implementation as far as I know, and I believe it’s used successfully in internal infrastructure at many companies. It’s more of a moral/philosophical argument that ISPs shouldn’t be allowed to extort their customers.