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Catalin Cighi 4/11/2016
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Private. Collaborators only.
Selection made on Version 2
The human gut, particularly the colon, has the highest recorded microbial density of any known microbial habitat. Our gut is almost the perfect environment to support the biodiversity and complexity that is our gut biome. The temperatures are well regulated, with us, the human host, able to survive in extreme conditions. The host can travel to extreme distances though their lifetime transporting and sharing microbes with these environments. From the perspective of the microbes, we are an almost perfectly evolved life support system for them. Maybe it’s arrogant to think about the microbes as some sort of “little helpers” in our system, but maybe it’s more accurate to think of us as architectural innovations by the microbes[0].
Maybe it’s arrogant to think about the microbes as some sort of “little helpers” in our system, but maybe it’s more accurate to think of us as architectural innovations by the microbes
Similarly, cancer cells == individuals who no longer comply with the system. Might respond better to diplomacy than to attacks.
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Patsy Baudoin 1/15/2016
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Aren’t microbes cells? Are you saying that there are more microbes than non-microbial cells in the human body?
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Joichi Ito 1/26/2016
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It has been cited widely that there are ten times more bacteria in our body than human cells. However, just this month a new paper was published in Nature ( http://www.nature.com/news/scientists-bust-myth-that-our-bodies-have-more-bacteria-than-human-cells-1.19136 ) and they now claim that it’s about the same number and that “The numbers are similar enough that each defecation event may flip the ratio to favour human cells over bacteria.” According to the paper, “The 10:1 myth persisted from a 1972 estimate by microbiologist Thomas Luckey, which was ‘elegantly performed, yet was probably never meant to be widely quoted decades later’, say the paper’s authors.”